A Big Fat Branding Project

I’ve totally neglected this blog. I’m sorry. I’ve been working on a big project deadline that had me living in the studio for the first two weeks of this term, but now that I’ve finished, I’ll show you what I’ve done. As mentioned in a previous post, the brief was to devise the creative strategy for a new company that manufactures and supplies art and design materials, and come up with the branding, advertising and marketing. Provided we presented an overall holistic of the brand, it was up to us what we actually designed.

I came up with a brand named ‘Draw’, an art and design supplier that seeks to encourage young artists and designers to stop using the computer and start drawing again. It celebrates spontaneous creativity and seeks to take away the fear of the blank page, promoting a more expressive and less precious attitude towards drawing and creativity as a whole. Targeting young artists, designers and students in creative disciplines, the brand was born to motivate this audience and stimulate a creative impulse often lost amongst new technology.

I chose to hand render the logo to support the brand’s own values, and use the ‘A’ to suggest the lead of a pencil. I wanted the logo to be clear and simple, particularly because I knew it would live in a busy environment, I’ll explain why in a moment.

Draw Logo

Brand Logo

I wrote a brand myth, and used it as a way of speaking directly to the consumer in the form of a motivational statement. The myth would be displayed in-store and on packaging to reinforce the idea of the brand and promote a kind of drawing revolution. I chose to visually enhance the statement for in-store display, to ensure the brand is fully supporting itself and drawing at every opportunity.

Brand Myth

Brand Myth

The brand would launch into market with a promotional week event entitled, ‘The Festival of Draw.’ The event would include workshops at the flagship store, and interactive advertising on the streets and in train stations around London. Postcards would be distributed to art galleries, art colleges and universities throughout the city to reach the target audience. The consumer would be invited to come to the store, experiment with the materials available to purchase, and illustrate the shop’s walls and windows, as a way of ‘bringing the store to life’.

Launch Event Invite

Launch Event Invite

Launch Event Invite

Launch Event Invite

Interactive advertising billboards would echo this concept on the streets of London. The advert would start as a blank canvas, encourage customers to draw spontaneously, and use arrows along the floor to drive traffic towards the store. The below image is an example of illustrations people might draw on the white billboards.

Interactive Ad Campaign

Interactive Ad Campaign

Interactive Ad Campaign

Interactive Ad Campaign

After the initial ‘The Festival of Draw’ week, the Draw advertising campaign would continue to use interactive advertising to drive traffic towards the store. Giant notepads would be installed at bus stops, on tube platforms and inside the carriages, once again, encouraging passers by to stop and draw. Paper and the pens attached would be products on sale at Draw, the reverse side of the paper would have the brand myth, directions/ map and other shop information, and once again, arrows would direct customers along the pavement to the store. The idea behind the campaign is to target people when they have nothing to do other that wait, and encourage them to make better use of their time by drawing.

As the customer arrives at the flagship store, the exterior of Draw is desgined to work like an art installation. In keeping with the key brand values, the installation would make the entire building look as if it has been drawn on top of, extending from the shop’s doors as if the the brand’s energy is spilling out onto the pavement and walls. Along the high street, this would instantly attract any passers by and promote a key principle of the brand, ‘Never stop drawing’, implying that we couldn’t help but illustrated the shop itself.

Store Layout

Store Layout

As mentioned, the store opened as an entirely white space, like a blank canvas, ready to be illustrated and brought to life by the customers. By this point, the walls, windows and surfaces will be covered with people’s artwork. The idea behind the store design is to create an open, light, white space, much like an ideal artist’s studio. It would be a stimulating place to shop, a constantly evolving space, updated throughout the year with newly painted walls to be drawn upon again. It would effectively become an art gallery in its own right. I want it to embody the brand’s refreshing attitude towards creativity, and motivate the consumer to try new materials. In order to persuade people to expand their pencil case, I think it’s important to allow customers to test materials first, and then allow the atmosphere of the store to persuade them to expan their pencil case, and go ahead and buy the products.

Store Layout

Store Layout

When deciding on the visual aesthetic, I had to consider how everything would sit amongst the busy illustrations and drawings that I knew would be a large part of the visuals. I felt that in such an environment, I needed the design be clear and simple.

I developed two ranges of art materials. The first is a ‘basics’ range of pens and pencils called ‘Draw everyday’. For this I designed minimal packaging, using white space to fit with the visual aesthetic of the store and to echo the idea of starting with a blank canvas.

Bag Design

Bag Design

The design fits into the logo, making a pencil shape, whilst the fill of the pencil shows how the product is used, and the typical mark-making techniques achievable.

Draw Everyday Range

Draw Everyday Range

For the pencil packaging, the fill of the pencil indicates the softness of the lead. For example, left to right = 4B, 2B, HB, H, 2H

Draw Everyday Range

Draw Everyday Range

Colour Pencils use a cut out pencil shape to reveal the colours in the box, and all pencils would be foil stamped with the Draw logo.

Draw Everyday Range

I then went on to design a revolutionary range of products to reflect the brands key values of experimentation and engaging in creativity. The materials are to designed to force the user to be expressive. Three products would include:

  • Draw with Fingertips

Each pack of Fingertips contains 10 mini felt tips designed to fit on the end of your fingers, in the same way as a thimble would. They take away creative control and allow the user to make up to ten marks at once on the page. The back of pack reads, ‘Feed your creative impulse and put pens to paper. Engage in spontaneous creativity with felt tips at your fingertips. Work big and be expressive!’

  • Draw with The Giant Pencil

The Giant Pencil would be approximately 4ft high, requiring two people to successfully draw something with it. It is designed to encourage working outside the sketchbook on a much larger scale. The back of pack reads, ‘Let yourself go with this ultimate tool of expression. Forget control, forget precision and experience a whole new way of drawing. Work big!’

  •  Draw with The Unstoppable Pen

The Unstoppable Pen is a revolutionary idea whereby the design of the pen causes ink to flow extra fast from the tip. This forces expressive mark-making and eliminates any kind of precision or slow-paced working. The box for this product would be made from two layers of clear plastic, and ink would sit in between these layers, giving the illusion that ink is spilling from the unstoppable pen. The back of pack reads, ‘There’s no time to think when creative juices are flowing this fast. Be expressive and work quickly because the ink won’t stop!’

Expressive Range

The Expressive Range

The Expressive Range

The Expressive Range

That’s pretty much it, I’ve handed in and I’m already onto the next project, but comments are always welcome!

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